About eight years ago, an American teenager in the same chat forum as I, complained that everyone was bored in life and suggested that what America needed was a war to liven things up. I remember the onslaught of replies that suggested America was invincible and such attacks would never happen. There was a feeling of shock running through me when he posted. Eight years later, the twin towers were brought down. That teenager would have been in his twenties by that time – perhaps newly out of university and just starting a career – perhaps in Wall Street. I always wonder if he remembered his post and if that was the war he envisaged.

Computer games are important in many lives. They create challenges and interaction with others and allow many with disabilities to communicate in a way that they could not in their real life. The environment is rich in visual stimulation and the designs are superb. Teenagers, who are predominantly the users of these games, constantly seek this form of activity. I would much rather see them gaming than creating havoc on the streets. But you need a computer to game and for some games you need a powerful internet connection. That’s not something that everyone can afford.

The media use the term ‘addiction’ more frequently than ever these days when discussing computer gaming. Stories of users committing suicide or relationship failures blamed on this addiction are rich pickings for journalists. But to what extent can we blame gamers for being obsessed with a world that takes them out of their real one?

Are you an addict? Take the test!

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